biomedicalephemera:

Top: Primary mammary blood vessels, deep tissue of nipple, outer nipple and areola

Bottom: Lymphatic supply to breast, vertical view of mammary duct exit, lactiferous ducts

The human breast is an odd organ, even among mammals. It is significantly developed even before pregnancy, while most mammals develop only the ductal regions (the nipple and its connecting supply) prior to parturition, and its variance between individuals can be massive, even while they all function equally well for supplying nutriment to our offspring.

The lactiferous ducts are the smallest units of the lactation (milk-supplying) system of the breast, and the epithelial cells within them extract the nutrients and liquid from the lymphatic and circulatory system when they’re triggered by the hormone prolactin, which is secreted both in response to labor and from suckling. Though the massive dose of prolactin from late-term pregnancy and giving birth is what kick-starts milk production, the suckling action is what keeps it going. In some humans (even some males), the prolactin secretion in response to sustained suckling is enough to begin producing milk, themselves.

Atlas d’Anatomie Descriptive du Corps Humain. C. Bonamy and Paul Broca, 1866.

samichudyk-art:

Virginity: Mutlimedia

samichudyk-art:

Virginity: Mutlimedia

(Source: tinei, via theformofbeauty)

lindenblossomtea:

Feverfew
Feverfew (a corruption of Febrifuge, from its tonic and fever-dispelling properties) is a composite plant growing in every hedgerow, with numerous, small, daisy-like heads of yellow flowers with outer white rays, the central yellow florets being arranged on a nearly flat receptacle, not conical as in the chamomiles. The stem is finely furrowed and hairy, about 2 feet high; the leaves alternate, downy with short hairs, or nearly smooth-about 4 1/2 inches long and 2 inches broad - bipinnatifid, with serrate margins, the leaf-stalk being flattened above and convex beneath. It is not to be confounded with other wild chamomile-like allied species, which mostly have more feathery leaves and somewhat large flowers; the stem also is upright, whereas that of the true garden Chamomile is procumbent. The delicate green leaves are conspicuous even in mild winter. The whole plant has a strong and bitter smell, and is particularly disliked by bees. A double variety is cultivated in gardens for ornamental purposes, and its flower-heads are sometimes substituted for the double Chamomile.
Country people have long been accustomed to make curative uses of this herb, which grows abundantly throughout England. Gerard tells us that it may be used both in drinks, and bound on the wrists is of singular virtue against the ague.
A decoction with sugar or honey is said to be good for coughs, wheezing and difficult breathing. The herb, bruised and heated, or fried with a little wine and oil, has been employed as a warm external application for wind and colic. A tincture made from Feverfew and applied locally immediately relieves the pain and swelling caused by bites of insects and vermin. It is said that if two teaspoonfuls of tincture are mixed with 1/2 pint of cold water, and all parts of the body likely to be exposed to the bites of insects are freely sponged with it, they will remain unassailable. A tincture of the leaves of the true Chamomile and of the German Chamomile will have the same effect.

lindenblossomtea:

Feverfew

Feverfew (a corruption of Febrifuge, from its tonic and fever-dispelling properties) is a composite plant growing in every hedgerow, with numerous, small, daisy-like heads of yellow flowers with outer white rays, the central yellow florets being arranged on a nearly flat receptacle, not conical as in the chamomiles. The stem is finely furrowed and hairy, about 2 feet high; the leaves alternate, downy with short hairs, or nearly smooth-about 4 1/2 inches long and 2 inches broad - bipinnatifid, with serrate margins, the leaf-stalk being flattened above and convex beneath. It is not to be confounded with other wild chamomile-like allied species, which mostly have more feathery leaves and somewhat large flowers; the stem also is upright, whereas that of the true garden Chamomile is procumbent. The delicate green leaves are conspicuous even in mild winter. The whole plant has a strong and bitter smell, and is particularly disliked by bees. A double variety is cultivated in gardens for ornamental purposes, and its flower-heads are sometimes substituted for the double Chamomile.

Country people have long been accustomed to make curative uses of this herb, which grows abundantly throughout England. Gerard tells us that it may be used both in drinks, and bound on the wrists is of singular virtue against the ague.

A decoction with sugar or honey is said to be good for coughs, wheezing and difficult breathing. The herb, bruised and heated, or fried with a little wine and oil, has been employed as a warm external application for wind and colic. A tincture made from Feverfew and applied locally immediately relieves the pain and swelling caused by bites of insects and vermin. It is said that if two teaspoonfuls of tincture are mixed with 1/2 pint of cold water, and all parts of the body likely to be exposed to the bites of insects are freely sponged with it, they will remain unassailable. A tincture of the leaves of the true Chamomile and of the German Chamomile will have the same effect.

Eartha Kitt & Nat King Cole in St. Louis Blues (1958)

Eartha Kitt & Nat King Cole in St. Louis Blues (1958)

(via losetheboyfriend)

One of my favorites

(Source: dazedpanda, via forevertime)

(Source: bearbrandt)

 
 

Bela Lugosi playing poker with Santa, 1940, 

 

Bela Lugosi playing poker with Santa, 1940, 

(Source: vintagegal)

Flirting with Death

Flirting with Death

(Source: spells-of-life, via bohemma)

(Source: neverdwell)

(Source: mrporter, via theclassyissue)